Your First Mixed Cryptic: Anagrams, Charades and Double Definitions

Well, isn't this exciting: it's time for your first mixed cryptic, featuring the three types of clue we've learned so far: anagrams, charades and double definitions.

Here's  reminder of some of the tricks you can use to distinguish these different cluetypes, though (of course) it might not be simple to tell in practice....

  • Anagrams are anagrams. They have an indictator word that conveys anagram-ness – there's a barmy range of options but they include words related to scrambledness, confusion, chaos, movement, arrangement, vigorousness, weirdness, madness, explosions, brokenness, disturbance, and so many more
  • Charades have no indictator words. They are composed of a series of synonyms, abbreviations and literal words that you string together to get the answer.
  • Double Definitions have no indicators. They're composed of two literal definitions, usually describing different senses of the word. A very short (three or four word) clue is liable to be a double definition.

But you don't need all this talk, you're surely raring to start – welcome to the fine feeling of sitting down in a nice chair on a sunny/rainy/cloudy day and solving a cryptic grid, may you have many more to come....

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