Laser Vegetable


Every Sunday, Browser subscribers get a full "magazine" edition with a quiz, a crossword, archive picks and more – here's a taster of this week's treats. Join us for more.

Quiz Of The Week

  1. Apple introduced the LaserWriter printer in March 1985. Guess how much it cost then, and how much it weighed.
  2. He served as a British colonial civil servant in what is now Sri Lanka, before returning to London and marrying a woman whose fame would far eclipse his own, though he outlived her by 28 years, dying in 1969. Who was he?
  3. President Trump had a small red button installed on his desk in the Oval Office. President Biden had the button removed. What did the button do?
  4. What was the Vegetable Lamb Of Tartary?

Archive Pick: Thank You For Finding My Son

Michael McWatters | Medium | 10th January 2018

Open letter from the father of an autistic boy to an Ikea staffer who saw the boy run off into the store and sensed a need to assist. “You did a remarkable thing. You saw a kid running away from his dad and understood there was something more at play. Most people wouldn’t have given the situation a second thought, but you did. You spared us both from excruciating anxiety — or worse” (940 words)


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🦒 Browser Interview: Phares Kariuki

Uri Bram talks about trust, justice, and human nature with The Browser's favourite philosopher of technology, Phares Kariuki, CEO of Pure Infrastructure Limited and host of the Pure Infrastructure Podcast.

Phares:  

The secret to the human race isn't so much our intelligence, rather it's our cooperation. The best hunters cooperate; persistence hunting is how human beings evolved in the savannah. Killer whales and African wild dogs also persistence hunt and this leads to some of the highest kill rates of any predators

Read more....


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Quiz Answers

  1. Apple introduced the LaserWriter printer in March 1985. Guess how much it cost then, and how much it weighed.
    The first LaserWriter printer cost US$6,995 (equivalent to $16,832 in 2020) and weighed 77 lbs (35 kg). It was the first printer to ship with Adobe's PostScript page description language, sparking the desktop publishing revolution of the mid-1980s. In 1988 Apple launched a more "affordable" printer, the LaserWriter II, with a list price of $4,599 and a weight of 45 lbs.
  2. He served as a British colonial civil servant in what is now Sri Lanka, before returning to London and marrying a woman whose fame would far eclipse his own, though he outlived her by 28 years, dying in 1969. Who was he?
    He was Leonard Woolf, a prolific writer in his own right, mostly of political tracts, but best remembered as the husband of novelist and critic Virginia Woolf, who committed suicide in 1941. Together they founded the Hogarth Press in 1917, which published, inter alia, the first edition of T.S. Eliot's The Wasteland.
  3. President Trump had a small red button installed on his desk in the Oval Office. President Biden had the button removed. What did the button do?
    The button signalled a White House aide to bring the President a Diet Coke on a silver platter.
  4. What was the Vegetable Lamb Of Tartary?
    The Vegetable Lamb Of Tartary was a mythical fruit (or animal) believed to grow on trees across the Russian steppe from the Caspian to the Pacific. According to some commentators, the fruit "perfectly resembled a lamb, with legs, hooves, ears and head". Others claimed that the Lamb was an actual animal, or perhaps a hybrid of animal and plant, which nonetheless grew on trees. Belief in the Tartary Lamb remains strong among Western scholars in the 16th and early 17th centuries, but crumbled in the late 17th century as travellers began crossing Siberia and failing to find it.

Caroline Crampton, Editor-In-Chief; Robert Cottrell, Founding Editor; Jodi Ettenberg, Associate Editor; Uri Bram, CEO & Publisher; Al Breach, Founding Director

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